A father in a suit crosses his arms angrily. His wife looks at him apprehensively, while his two adult sons look at him warily.
Craig Wallace as Willy Loman with cast members Thomas Keegan, Kimberly Schraf and Danny Gavigan for Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. The Ford’s Theatre production plays at Sept. 22 to Oct. 22, 2017. Photo by Scott Suchman.

Death of a Salesman

A Pulitzer Prize-Winning Classic about the Cost of the American Dream

date September 22, 2017 — October 22, 2017
duration 3 hours with one intermission
rating Recommended for ages 13 and older.
accessibility Accessible

Willy Loman’s career is over. During a pivotal 24 hours, he reflects on his life as a father, husband and traveling salesman. Truth and lies intermingle as Willy tries to reconcile the optimism of his youth with his unfulfilled dreams. As the full force of reality crashes down on him, he places his last hope of success in his two sons. Arthur Miller’s classic play challenges us to reconsider what it means to succeed and the cost of chasing the American Dream. Stephen Rayne (“Our Town,” “The Widow Lincoln,” “Sabrina Fair”) directs Craig Wallace as Willy Loman and Kimberly Schraf as Linda.


Cast

Nora Achrati

Waiter

Silhouette of a human head on black.

Aakhu TuahNera Freeman

Jenny

Silhouette of a human head on black.

Danny Gavigan

Happy Loman

Headshot of actress Jennifer Gerdts

Jennifer Gerdts

The Woman

Headshot of actor Thomas Keegan.

Thomas Keegan

Biff Loman

Headshot of actor Joe Mallon.

Joe Mallon

Stanley

Headshot for actor Brandon McCoy

Brandon McCoy

Bernard

Silhouette of a human head on black.

Lynette Rathnam

Letta

Headshot of actor KenYatta Rogers.

KenYatta Rogers

Howard Wagner

Headshot of actor Michael Russotto.

Michael Russotto

Charley

Silhouette of a human head on black.

Kimberly Schraf

Linda

Silhouette of a human head on black.

Frederick Strother

Uncle Ben

Silhouette of a human head on black.

Katheryn Tkel

Miss Forsythe

Headshot of actor Craig Wallace.

Craig Wallace

Willy Loman

Silhouette of a human head on black.

JaBen Early

Understudy

From the Gallery

An older woman in a nightgown and robe wraps her arms around the shoulders of her husband, an older man in green and black pin-stripe pajamas. He looks up wistfully.

Craig Wallace (Willy Loman) and Kimberly Schraf (Linda) in the Ford’s Theatre production of “Death of a Salesman,” directed by Stephen Rayne. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

An older woman stands, grasping the arms of her two adult sons, who are seated at a table. Her face is full of pain and pleading. One son looks dismayed. The other looks angry. They are all in their pajamas.

Danny Gavigan (Happy), Kimberly Schraf (Linda) and Thomas Keegan (Biff) in the Ford’s Theatre production of “Death of a Salesman,” directed by Stephen Rayne. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

An older man in a vest and suit pants holds his arms at his sides, expressing anger. His wife is in her pajamas with her hand to her mouth in disbelief. His adult sons are also in their pajamas. They sit at a table and look confused.

Craig Wallace (Willy Loman), Kimberly Schraf (Linda), Danny Gavigan (Happy) and Thomas Keegan (Biff) in the Ford’s Theatre production of “Death of a Salesman,” directed by Stephen Rayne. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

A husband and wife stand by a table, talking simultaneously to their two adult sons, who are seated.

Kimberly Schraf (Linda), Danny Gavigan (Happy), Craig Wallace (Willy Loman) and Thomas Keegan (Biff) in the Ford’s Theatre production of “Death of a Salesman,” directed by Stephen Rayne. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

At right, a father in a suit looks proudly at his grown son, who wears a letter sweater and carries a football.

Thomas Keegan (Biff) and Craig Wallace (Willy Loman) in the Ford’s Theatre production of “Death of a Salesman,” directed by Stephen Rayne. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

A young man in a letter jacket carries a football. His mom looks on proudly while carrying laundry. His father, dressed in a suit, speaks to him. His younger brother, also wearing a letter jacket, carries the rest of the football gear. His uncle, dressed in a light linen suit, leans on a cane.

Thomas Keegan (Biff), Kimberly Schraf (Linda), Craig Wallace (Willy Loman), Danny Gavigan (Happy) and Frederick Strother (Ben) in the Ford’s Theatre production of “Death of a Salesman,” directed by Stephen Rayne. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

An older woman in a nightgown and robe pleased with her husband, an older man still dressed in a suit.

Kimberly Schraf (Linda) and Craig Wallace (Willy Loman) in the Ford’s Theatre production of “Death of a Salesman,” directed by Stephen Rayne. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

"Big and faithful! Craig Wallace and Kimberly Schraf — partners in real life — share some lovely, unguarded moments that draw you into the Lomans’ struggles, but they are also unflinchingly brusque with the family’s uglier moments."
– The Washington Post
"Ford's Theatre's must-see production is raw and gripping in its emotional intensity. Led by Craig Wallace's powerhouse performance as Willy Loman, Miller's Pulitzer Prize winning play is as relevant now, maybe more so, in its questioning of the American dream as it was when it first opened."
– Broadway World
"Fresh and relevant! Five stars! Craig Wallace is a powerful actor, capable of bathing the stage in swagger and menace, but he brings a surprising amount of vulnerability to his portrayal of Willy. "Death of a Salesman" is arguably the best American play of the twentieth century."
– DC Theatre Scene
"Stirring! D.C. theater vet Craig Wallace shines in the titular role of salesman Willy Loman. The name 'Willy Loman' conjures a slight figure, but Wallace’s stocky, powerful frame makes Loman’s descent in dementia all the more tragic to observe. He’s superb."
– City Paper
"Ford’s Theatre’s emotionally-enriched production highlights the “everyman” in Miller’s story that speaks to each of us. The perennially relevant social drama seems as timely as ever in this powerful Ford’s Theatre revival."
– DC Metro Theatre Arts
"Ford's Theatre is giving a very polished production to Salesman, one that leaves no doubt as to why this play has remained so beloved since it was first produced in 1949."
– Theatermania
"Craig Wallace, in the leading role, gives a passionate, unguarded performance that amplifies the play’s painful truths."
– Metro Weekly

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